Crowns – International Dental Services

Crowns

Dental Crowns and Veneers

Cracked Teeth

Dental porcelain can be sculpted to closely replicate the look of natural tooth enamel, while providing desirable strength and resilience. Porcelain crowns are an excellent choice when recreating the form and function of a damaged tooth, because a crown basically replaces the entire external portion of the tooth down to the gum level. Crowns are not limited to simply replacing the original tooth, but can be designed to create an even better esthetic appearance.

dental crowns

 

Cosmetic Inlays and Onlays

Inlays and onlays are indirect restorations that can be used to help an otherwise healthy tooth with a large filling. Inlays are placed within the grooves between the cusps (points) of a tooth, whereas onlays are placed within the grooves and over the cusp tips. Your AACD member dentist can help determine which restoration is better for you. Inlays and onlays can be used to replace old filings, and are more esthetically pleasing because they can be made to match a tooth’s natural color. Aside from improving a tooth’s appearance, inlays and onlays can strengthen the structure of a tooth because of their durability and longevity.

 

Crown Consultation

Dental Crowns can be selected for necessity or cosmetic reasons. No matter what the case, the first step is to schedule an appointment with your AACD dental professional. The dentist will examine your teeth and in some cases will immediately see that a crown is the best option. In other situations where the problems aren’t so obvious, you may need to express your concerns and discuss your future smile goals so both you and your dentist have all the facts.

 

The Hows and Whys of Porcelain Crowns

Porcelain crowns replace the exterior portion of a tooth to reestablish its original function and to create a natural appearance. Crowns are the treatment of choice in situations where tooth decay has destroyed most of the original tooth, when a traumatic event has caused damage, or in cases of severe enamel erosion. They are also an option for people who grind and clench their teeth so much that the original structure of their teeth has been compromised.
The great benefit to porcelain crowns is they can not only replicate the original tooth in function, but can be designed to look like the original–or even better. When patients select a porcelain veneer for cosmetic reasons, they’re usually covering up the front portion of the tooth that has some esthetic flaw. A porcelain crown is thicker than a veneer and, in some situations, this thickness is needed. A porcelain crown can be used for cosmetic reasons, but it’s best to seek the advice of an AACD member dentist.
Crowns and veneers are situated and secured in the mouth in a similar fashion, using a light-sensitive resin placed between the original tooth and crown, and then hardening that resin with a special curing light.
Partial crowns, often referred to as onlays, are a type of restoration or filling that covers one or more cusps. An inlay is similar to a filling but the work resides completely within the cusps on a tooth’s chewing surface. These restorations are much more conservative than crowns, and can be imperceptible from your natural tooth.

 

Potential Crown Downsides

Porcelain crowns do require some laboratory time to be created and times vary according to the laboratory and its distance from your dentist, so expect to be fitted with a temporary, or provisional, crown for a while.
Some patients may experience sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures after porcelain crowns are attached. It’s best to consult with your dentist for more information about your individual case.
While porcelain crowns are very durable, they do not have the flexibility of natural teeth, so avoiding certain foods may be necessary. Chronic tooth-grinders and jaw-clenchers will need to be fitted with a nighttime mouth guard to protect the porcelain from unnecessary and excessive pressure and use.

 

Maintenance of a Porcelain Crown

Maintaining porcelain crowns is actually quite simple. Much like your original teeth, they require routine brushing with nonabrasive fluoride toothpaste and regular flossing.

A follow-up appointment will be scheduled to evaluate the crowns shortly after they’re placed, so the dentist can review the work and see how your mouth is reacting to the crowns. Even if you think the crowns are successful, this follow-up appointment is an important part of your future oral health.

Porcelain veneers are thin pieces of porcelain used to recreate the natural look of teeth, while also providing strength and resilience comparable to natural tooth enamel. It is often the material of choice for those looking to make slight position alterations, or to change tooth shape, size, and/or color.

Zirconium Crowns

Do you want to learn about Zirconium Crowns to discover if zirconium crowns are the right choice for you?

These days with so much information on the internet it can get confusing and frustrating trying to discover which dental treatment is right for you and it’s hard to know who to believe and trust.

I have put this blog together to ensure that you get the right information you need to make the best decision, when deciding if zirconium crowns are the right choice for you, or if one of the other dental treatments is more appropriate for you.

Zirconium crowns and bridges are so strong they can be used anywhere in the mouth. Zirconium crowns can withstand the biting pressure of the front teeth as well as back teeth grinding.

The look of zirconium crowns and bridges is so close to natural teeth that it is hard to tell the difference and it is this quality which makes it very usable within dental work. Zirconium crowns can be fixed using traditional dental cements.

Zirconium crowns have quickly become the preferred material for dental crowns. Zirconium is a very strong substance that can endure wear and tear of everyday use. When looking at Zirconium crowns from an aesthetic point it is clear and very similar to a natural tooth and reflects light the same way. This may be important if your new crowns are on the front of your mouth and it is particularly relevant in cases where the crown will be seen next to the natural teeth.

Porcelain is the conventional material used for the new crowns however, Full porcelain can chip or break. This is overcome by making the crowns from the metal, in this case metal zirconia, then merge the porcelain on the outside. Zirconia metal gives the strength while the porcelain gives the appearance of a normal tooth. Zirconium crowns allow light to pass as a normal tooth would and that gives a natural look, unlike other metal cores that are block the light.

 

Zirconium Crowns

General Definition: A crown is a dental restoration that completely covers or surrounds a tooth or dental implant and it is typically fixed to the tooth using traditional dental cement. Crowns can be made out of numerous materials, which are usually fabricated using out-of-mouth method. Crowns are frequently used to improve strength or appearance of teeth. Full-porcelain (ceramic) dental materials include porcelain, ceramic or glass screen fillings and crowns (aka jacket crown, a metal free option).

Overview

Zirconium crowns won’t corrode and the normal black gum line that you can see around a porcelain fused metal crown, won’t happen because of the strong ceramic material used. Also the normal too hot/cold sensations you can feel with other crowns does not normally occur because of the lack of electrical conductivity.

Zirconium Crowns – Procedures

Procedure consists of:

To accommodate the new zirconium crowns a portion of your natural tooth’s structure is removed.

A temporary crown will be installed between visits, while the custom zirconium crowns are made in our laboratories, from the impression taken of the original teeth.

When the new zirconium crowns are ready the temporary crowns will be removed and your new custom zirconium crowns are securely fixed in place.

 

Veneer Consultation

prepless veneer
Visiting an AACD member dentist and asking about veneers is the first step in determining if veneers are the right option for you, or if there are alternate solutions available. Communication with your dentist about what you want corrected is critical for a successful result. Spend time clearly identifying what cosmetic improvements you want to accomplish.

You’ll often hear people say that celebrities have veneers and this may seem like the best way to replicate picture-perfect teeth, but each mouth is different and veneers need to be carefully researched.

Your dentist will most likely begin with a smile analysis to determine what steps are necessary to achieve the smile you desire. In addition, your dentist may create a diagnostic mock-up that will allow you to “try on” veneers and other procedures to see if the final result is actually what you’re looking for.
Your dentist may also show you a photo of how your new smile will look. This is called cosmetic imaging.
Deciding that porcelain veneers will create the look you want is only one step in the process. There is much more to learn before proceeding further.

 

The Hows and Whys of Porcelain Veneers

Porcelain laminate veneers consist of a compilation of several thin ceramic layers which replace original tooth enamel, and an adhesive layer. To apply a veneer, a very small amount of the original tooth enamel must be removed, usually less than a millimeter. This is essential as it creates room for the porcelain veneer to fit within the mouth and most accurately restore natural tooth function while creating an even better appearance than the original tooth.

The bond between original tooth and porcelain veneer is critical as it not only provides the esthetic perfection desired,but also a strong bond which is essential for correct veneer function. Light-sensitive resin is placed between the original tooth and the veneer and then hardened using a special curing light.

Porcelain veneers are a very successful option in many situations where the original tooth has developed poor color, shape, and contours. It is also a good choice for fractured teeth, gaps between teeth, and in some situations where the tooth position is compromised and there are minor bite-related problems. For some people, superficial stains do not respond well to tooth whitening or bleaching. In these situations, a porcelain veneer may be the best option.

 

Minimal Prep or “No-Prep” Veneers

Some patients are looking for an alternative to traditional dental veneers or bonding, but be aware that this treatment option is not appropriate for everyone.
Just as with porcelain veneers, “no-prep” or minimal preparation veneers— so called because they typically don’t require the dentist to remove as much tooth material—are bonded to the front surface of your teeth. Often, the placement of no-prep veneers can be done more quickly and with less discomfort than traditional veneers.
Your AACD member dentist will let you know if you are a good candidate for minimal preparation or “no-prep” veneers and if this option makes a sensible treatment plan.

Quoted from © 2011 American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry